The Doctrine of the Mean Quotes 17 - Confucius.

The superior man does what is proper to the station in which he is; he does not desire to go beyond this. In a position of wealth and honor, he does what is proper to a position of wealth and honor. In a poor and low position, he does what is proper to a poor and low position. Situated among barbarous tribes, he does what is proper to a situation among barbarous tribes. In a position of sorrow and difficulty, he does what is proper to a position of sorrow and difficulty. The superior man can find himself in no situation in which he is not himself. In a high situation, he does not treat with contempt his inferiors. In a low situation, he does not court the favor of his superiors. He rectifies himself, and seeks for nothing from others, so that he has no dissatisfactions. He does not murmur against Heaven, nor grumble against men. Thus it is that the superior man is quiet and calm, waiting for the appointments of Heaven, while the mean man walks in dangerous paths, looking for lucky occurrences.
Confucius
[Chinese: 孔夫子, transliterated Kong Fuzi or K'ung-fu-tzu, literally "Master Kong"] (traditionally 28 September 551 B.C. – 479 B.C.) Chinese social philosopher, whose teachings deeply influenced East Asian life and thought.
Nationality: Chinese
Occupation: Philosopher
Sources by Confucius
The Analects
The Great Learning
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